Tides of Change

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

Coastal ecologist Dr. Steve Fradkin is a National Park Service scientist who spends his days in the intertidal zone of Olympic National Park. There, a spectacular diversity of plants and animals interact to form a living, breathing ecosystem that is an especially sensitive indicator of environmental health. Climate change is beginning to take its toll on this fragile ecosystem, but as long as Steve gets a good cup of coffee, he'll be out there monitoring the changes and figuring out what we as humans can do to help.

 

Keepers of the Beat

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

Glaciers are sensitive indicators of climate change. In this video we meet Dr. Jon Riedel, lead glaciologist at North Cascades National Park. Jon shows how he monitors glaciers and explains his reasons for doing so.

Preserving History & Homes

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

This five-minute video features staff at Ebey's Landing National Historic Reserve explaining how they preserve and protect a historic cultural landscape.

Life & Death in the Forest

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

This "Science Minute Video" shows Park Service scientists at Mount Rainier National Park checking on the health of trees. As part of the Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Program, each year they hike to remote plots to monitor trees and look for impacts caused by weather, age, or disease.

 

Vegetation Wars

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

Exotic plant invaders are a big problem in the National Parks. This five-minute film highlights the efforts to control exotic invasive plants at Lewis & Clark National Historical Park. Resource Management specialist Carla Cole explains how this is done and why she loves this work.

Restoring Native Prairies

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

Very few areas in the Pacific Northwest retain the landscape as it was hundreds of years ago. This "Science Minute Video" highlights the work of resource managers at San Juan Islands National Historical Park to restore native prairie by removing exotic invaders and replanting native vegetation.

Taking the Pulse

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

Although Northwest national parks are great for recreation they are also living laboratories offering great opportunities for science. A law passed by Congress in 1998 established a system of Inventory & Monitoring in which the parks collaborate together to monitor ecosystem health year after year. This film features Park Service scientists and staff explaining their vision of the parks.

Working Between the Tides

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

Tidepool coastal ecosystems will be among the first places to show impacts from sea level rise and climate change. This six-minute film shows Dr. Steve Fradkin, marine ecologist at Olympic National Park showing how ocean life is monitored along the coast. We see Fradkin's crew doing their work and explaining their motivation for doing this.

Measuring Glaciers

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

This five-minute film shows Mount Rainier and North Cascades glacier scientists explaining how they monitor park glaciers and why they do so. Glaciers are important water sources for fish, recreation, and hydropower and they're melting fast.

Connecting With Carnivores

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

Most carnivores need larger areas to roam than plant-eating animals. Discovering their numbers and distribution over the landscape is the work of carnivore monitoring. Roger Christophersen from North Cascades National Park explains how park scientists monitor carnivores using hair snares, motion detection cameras, and DNA analysis.

Pikas Send a Warning Call

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

Pikas are small furry mammals related to rabbits that live on steep rocky talus slopes. They are, unfortunately, in the direct path of danger caused by global climate change. This film shows the team at North Cascades National Park studying the pikas and talking about their work.

Digging For Untold Stories

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

This "Science Minute Video" shows staff and students from Fort Vancouver and the NW Cultural Resources Institute Archaeological Field School doing field work. Dr. Doug Wilson explains the work and the reasons why it's important.

Fishers Return

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

National Park Service policy aims to restore any animals "missing" from the parks due to human actions. The fisher is a weasel-family animal that was trapped to extinction for its beautiful fur by the 1930's in what is now Olympic National Park. Dr. Patti Happe, the park's wildlife biologist worked from 2008-2010.

Why We Work

Director of Photography: Eric Rejman

What's it like to be a National Park Service scientist? "Why We Work" shows National Park Service scientists from various parks in the Pacific Northwest explaining how they found their line of work and why they do what they do. This is a passionate group, deeply committed to protecting national parks.